/page/2

Barcelona Skyline from Marc Subirana on Vimeo.

We are proud to introduce this short video with a collection of aerial images filmed in Barcelona with a little drone. This video shows the magnificence of the buildings in Barcelona captured from a different point of view and offers the opportunity to see hidden details of Catalan architecture.

The images were taken by pumbaproduccions.com in collaboration with the innovative drones StartUp hemav.com from Barcelona, designed to provide civil services with UAV’s for different sectors, included film and advertising production of high safety and quality videos.

We are sure you’ll enjoy! Please watch in HD!

Music: Lady Labyrinth (Rework) - Ludovico Einaudi

Boss opening credits from Julio C. Piñeiro on Vimeo.

Opening credits for the Starz series Boss.

Property of Lionsgate Television and Starz Media LLC.

MAD//13 - Madrid Aerial Demo-Reel from cromatica45 on Vimeo.

ESP
Os presentamos nuestra nueva creación: un video de muestra sobre Madrid usando sólo planos aéreos de distintos puntos de la ciudad. Al usar nuestro equipo Phantom hemos podido acceder a lugares donde drone mayores habrían tenido más problemas.
Las posibilidades del vídeo aéreo son ilimitadas, y con el tiempo hemos sido capaces de realizar planos más complejos.
Si necesitas más información contacta con nosotros en info@cromatica45.com

EN
We introduce to you our new creation: a show reel of the Madrid City with only aerial footage from different places of the city. By using our DJI Phantom equipment we were able to flight in places were other bigger drones would have more problems.
The possibilities of aerial videography are endless, and gradualy we’ve learn to do more complex movements with our copter to create better recordings.
If you need more information contact us at info@cromatica45.com

"El Paso" scene in Breaking Bad plus the rest of it from Bonnie Rose on Vimeo.

When Stephen Colbert talked to Vince Gilligan about the song El Paso used in the season finale of Breaking Bad, he asked if Felina was Jesse or the blue meth, and Vince basically said Felina was the blue meth.. Viewed that way, the song El Paso matches up with not only the scene it was used in and the season finale, but the entire series. Or at least I was able to shoehorn it all in, I have no idea if this is how the creators meant any of this. So I put together the rest of it, just the way I saw it, to the whole song before and after the actual scene from the finale.

2014 - on fire from David Samuel Ares Esteve on Vimeo.

Feliz Navidad y Feliz Año Nuevo¡
Merry Christmas & Happy New Year¡
Joyeux Noël et Bonne Année!
2014

music / let the groove get in - justin timberlake
video / burning car - superflex / ein traum fon afrika - leni riefenstahl
stars / 2013-2014

MUSEO from Fundación Jumex on Vimeo.

En noviembre de 2013 se estrena el Museo Jumex, la nueva plataforma principal de Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo. Conoce el edificio y la visión de la fundación para esta sede.

The Museo Jumex opens in November 2013, taking its place as the new main platform of Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo. Get a preview of the building and the foundation’s plans for this site.

Producción: Buró-Buró
Realización: Inbox Films
Música original: Dario González Valderrama

Pencil / Think With Your Hands from FiftyThree on Vimeo.

Great tools inspire great ideas. Pencil is the most natural and expressive tool for getting ideas on Paper. Advanced technology meets beautiful design to keep you in the flow, without needing to switch tools. With Erase, Blend, and adaptive Palm Rejection, Pencil puts creative possibility in your hands.

Learn more about Pencil: fiftythree.com/pencil
Download Paper: itunes.apple.com/us/app/paper-by-fiftythree/id506003812?mt=8

Director: Andrew S Allen
Editing & Post Production: Kristofer Martin

Original Score: Patrick Cannell (patrickcannell.com)
Recording & Mastering: Jeremy Sklarsky (jeremysklarsky.com)
Cellist: Dave Eggar (facebook.com/daveeggar)
Recorded at Threshold Studios (thresholdstudios.com)

Music Supervision: Good Ear Music Supervision (goodear.tv)

Production: Allen Lau, Amy Cao, Denis Kovacs, KJ Chun, Jason Sondhi, Tara Feener

Special Thanks:
Chana Lee Mitty, Jen Mussari, and Amit Pitaru

folds | installation documentation | lindenau museum altenburg, germany | robert seidel | 2011 from Robert Seidel on Vimeo.

robertseidel.com/folds.225.0.html
FOLDS
Robert Seidel

Lindenau Museum / Altenburg, Germany
18.6.–14.8.2011
lindenau-museum.de

// Installation
2-channel video, HD, variable loop on 19th century plaster casts of Kladeos, Kephissos, Belvedere Torso, Seer and the Three Goddesses from the Bernhard August von Lindenau Collection
// Dimension: 7,2 × 1,9 × 2,4 m

// Part of Focus Young Art. 2011
A regional exhibition programme of the Juergen Ponto Foundation for promotion of Young Artists, Frankfurt am Main / juergen-ponto-stiftung.de

Documentation Editor Falk Müller
Documentation Sound Heiko Tippelt
Photography Jürgen M. Pietsch, Christian Seeling

// Artist Statement
The work folds for the Lindenau Museum (Altenburg, Germany) may be understood as a rapprochement with the history of the museum’s collection of plaster casts. I was particularly interested in the ancient, fragmented bodies – how through the loss of limbs they became almost abstract, fragmentary sculptures and yet still disclosed a nearly uncanny vitality. Also noteworthy is that the collection entails sculptures, Greek in origin, that have been replicated time and time again. Hewn from marble and partially painted in color, the originals were repeatedly copied in marble or plaster in different places across centuries, despoiled of color and slurred in detail.

Despite these multiple re-shapings that attend the loss of the original’s memory, new meanings and frictions arise with each copy in each respective present. They are the precondition for over 2400 years of the ongoing revitalization of the legacy of antiquity. The fold, a continually recurring visual and conceptual motif in my works, is for me the pictorial metaphor for these layers and distortions of meaning. In the projection the fold becomes connected to the fragmentary sculptures, swirls around them, makes them flow with bygone colors, protects or clothes them, gives them peace and lets them come alive for a moment, in order then to be stored as a further layer in the sediment of oblivion.

// Monographic Catalog available
FOLDS, Robert Seidel, Lindenau Museum Altenburg, ISBN 978-3-86104-070-0

robertseidel.com

Michael Rakowitz: Return from Smart Museum of Art on Vimeo.

Michael Rakowitz talks about Return, a project where he re-opened his grandfather’s import-export business in order to import Iraqi dates.

Learn more about Feast at smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/feast.

D (Detroit), short clip from video loop, 2007 from felix malnig on Vimeo.

D (Detroit)

c by Felix Malnig 2007
video loop, 16 minutes, silent

In Felix Malnig’s 2007 video D, a protean view of downtown Detroit is seen from the elevated tracks of the People Mover, a transportation system that circles the inner city. The train allows the rider—and the viewer—to see a passing city in a slow state of renewal but still blighted by neglect, failed projects and its own economically and socially challenged history. Along the way, the Renaissance Center appears; an important symbol of urban regeneration initiated in the early 70’s after rioting left the city burned and battered. The RenCen was completed in 1977 but never lived up to its potential as a spark for the development of new downtown. For Malnig, the Renaissance Center is an important symbol of the reality of many urban projects that attempt to positively change the fabric of urban living, but in the end, become empty commercial islands that do little to connect to the community or serve its constituents. Like his paintings and works on paper, Malnig’s film loop functions as a slow-moving frame that delivers scenes of a city in a state of change and evolution that ultimately returns to its own starting point. Felix Malnig lives and works in Vienna. He has shown his work throughout Europe; some of his signifcant recent exhibitions include Ghost Town at the Strabag Kunstforum, Vienna, Ghost Town at devening projects + editions, Chicago, Delusion at Habres + Partner, Vienna; First View at Hilger Contemporary, Vienna; artlab, Vienna; Visual Drugs, Zurich; and many more.

More information: felixmalnig.at

Dan Devening, 2008

Postmodernism at the V&A from Victoria and Albert Museum on Vimeo.

Postmodernism is the notoriously slippery subject tacked by the V&A’s exhibition, ‘Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990’. This fast-paced film features some of the most important living Postmodern practitioners, Charles Jencks, Robert A M Stern and Sir Terry Farrell among them, and asks them how and why Postmodernism came about, and what it means to be Postmodern.

TRANSCRIPT:

Andrew Logan: Post modernism – yes, I still really don’t understand what post modernism is. I’ve been told many times and it’s been explained to me many times and I still am bewildered. But perhaps that’s part of the movement – bewilderment.

Malcolm Garrett: I don’t think I really know too much about what post modernism actually is. For me, it’s primarily an architectural movement.

Robert A M Stern: Post modernism was a kind of style and it was kind of outrageous style at that.

Zandra Rhodes: I think we’re originals, but it wasn’t until I got spoken to by the V&A that I thought about anything that was post modern.

The way I worked I described as retrievalism.

Charles Jencks: The Independent said do use the word ‘post modernism’ because it means absolutely nothing and everything.

Malcolm Garrett: I called myself a new futurist for a while. So that’s a term I would use rather than post modernism.

Andrew Logan: Well, I suppose I had a very post modernist occurrence – I took acid. Normal things suddenly turned into something extraordinary.

Zandra Rhodes: Well, in 1977 punk was just starting to happen and I thought why not do tears that actually look like tears and then got safety pins and beaded round them like 12 years before Versace.

Malcolm Garrett: I had access to the first photocopier and I was able to modify and change the look of the image using a photocopier.

Peter Saville: And, of course, in the 70s and into the 80s the record cover was this incredibly important, vital medium of visual information. There were the music papers and occasionally the Sunday Times colour supplement might just do something about Andy Warhol in New York and that would be about it.

Paula Scher: In the 70s when I first started designing there was a predominance of the international style where the ultimate goal was to be clean and I always felt that that was like trying to clean up your room. So I was looking for ways of designing typography that could be more expressive, that were not about creating order but were about creating spirit.

Robert A M Stern: Times Square was where we were in charge - the whole revitalisation of Times Square is a very interesting, complicated story, but it does show the difference between the modernist point of view of how to redevelop or to develop a city and what we were able to do …

Charles Jencks: Post modern architecture is really to do with pluralism. You’ll find its depth, all of the great post modernism, the philosophy and now in literature, is about pluralism, pluralism, pluralism.

Robert A M Stern: To say, no, no, it’s a mess, in fact we ought to make it more of a mess. The world comes to Times Square not for tidykins, but for mess.

Charles Jencks: It’s accepting that the modern world with Freud, Marx, Henry Ford, mass production, is positive, but it can be radically improved.

Robert A M Stern: We studied the signage in Times Square and then we set minimums, minimums for sizes of signs, minimums for brightness of signs. What we were legislating in a way the capitalist impulse. Once you tell an entrepreneur that his or her sign can only be this big, he will be satisfied, he will agree with it. But if you say it can be this big or bigger or brighter, well everybody wants to compete in a capitalist society.

Charles Jencks: So you have to be on the one hand ironic about failures, probably the beginning of a new depression, another crisis of modernism, modernisation, modernity. What’s going to get us out of this? We have to re-think the modern movements in all the arts and in society and post modernism is the umbrella term for re-thinking.

Robert A M Stern: We knew 42nd Street was an incredible success when the Consolidated Edison Company called the State of New York and said, you know our grid is zapped out.

Peter Saville: In the case of, particularly, Joy Division and then New Order, they could never exactly agree amongst themselves. There was no hierarchical structure, particularly in New Order after the end of Joy Division, after Ian Curtis had died. The responsibility for the covers came to me and so they were about what I was interested in, they were about in a way beginning to learn the canon.

Carol McNicoll: The thing that I was doing was I was using slip casting. A lot of the Leach tradition and minimalist things also had that idea of expressing the deep, inner, mystic qualities of clay. And I thought that was a load of complete rubbish. And I thought what was wonderful about clay was the fact that you could make it look like anything else.

Peter Saville: They decided to call their first album “Movement”. The sequences and the pulse beat - there was a subtle transition from Joy Division to New Order and they had to find who they could be without Ian’s writing and without Ian’s singing. The pulse beat begins to become what New Order are about. I was quite happy to show New Order futurism because I was certain that Marinetti would have loved New Order.

Deyan Sudjic: Charles Jencks wrote this extraordinarily resonant sentence in ‘Post Modernism’ in which he said that modernism died in 1972 when Pruitt-Igoe was blown up.

Charles Jencks: In fact it goes back to the 60s really, in a radical way. Feminism, black power, a whole series of issues all over the world.

Terry Farrell: I think it was a release from constraint from the design codes – design as a function of the modern era.

Peter Saville: The notion of a singular aesthetic is untenable, is entirely unrealistic in a democratised society.

Terry Farrell: As such it was a Pandora’s box, the genie was out, so it’s about colour and ornament and try anything.

Robert A M Stern: If you take the actual broader, philosophical meaning of post modernism, there are no absolutes in art whether it’s architecture, painting, music, literature or whatever.

Terry Farrell: It’s a shift that brought the internet, the web – things were never the same again.

Reinhold Martin: During the - one of the high moments of modernism, the constructive period, artists like Varvara Steppanova and her colleagues, Rodchenko – the productivists. They were designing the way that they imagined the proletariat – the newly empowered and politicised proletariat - would dress. And the interesting question might be: What’s the difference between an Issey Miyake or a Commes des Garçons iteration of modernism? Can you imagine that garment in relation to political revolution? Probably not. You can imagine it as a kind of citation and if there is a thing called post modernism, it’s the absence of that thought. Can you imagine the Comme des Garçons worker? If the answer is no, then you’re in the world of post modernity.

Peter Saville: When Ian died, a kind of - the legend was sort of forged, almost overnight. The message of this story was more profound than any broadcast or marketing could ever be.

Carol McNicoll: One of the things that’s particular about the English tradition is that it’s very impure. Yes, we had an empire, we were forever nicking ideas from other places and kind of collage-ing them together.

Iain Sinclair: You’d have a piece of London that’s pre-Fire of London, that happens to have survived, right next to something that came in as a Christopher Wren development, something that came through the railway age, a cottage that’s hung on until it’s wiped out to put up a Westfield shopping mall, and all of these things co-exist.

Sam Jacob: That combination of complete victory of the neo-liberal economy alongside the diversity of culture, diversity of interests, I think makes it a place where things happen in a post modern way.

Iain Sinclair: And it all meshes on somewhere like the Thames, the reason for London’s foundation, that we come ashore from elsewhere and we reinvent ourselves by bringing people in that keep the culture alive.

Barcelona Skyline from Marc Subirana on Vimeo.

We are proud to introduce this short video with a collection of aerial images filmed in Barcelona with a little drone. This video shows the magnificence of the buildings in Barcelona captured from a different point of view and offers the opportunity to see hidden details of Catalan architecture.

The images were taken by pumbaproduccions.com in collaboration with the innovative drones StartUp hemav.com from Barcelona, designed to provide civil services with UAV’s for different sectors, included film and advertising production of high safety and quality videos.

We are sure you’ll enjoy! Please watch in HD!

Music: Lady Labyrinth (Rework) - Ludovico Einaudi

Boss opening credits from Julio C. Piñeiro on Vimeo.

Opening credits for the Starz series Boss.

Property of Lionsgate Television and Starz Media LLC.

MAD//13 - Madrid Aerial Demo-Reel from cromatica45 on Vimeo.

ESP
Os presentamos nuestra nueva creación: un video de muestra sobre Madrid usando sólo planos aéreos de distintos puntos de la ciudad. Al usar nuestro equipo Phantom hemos podido acceder a lugares donde drone mayores habrían tenido más problemas.
Las posibilidades del vídeo aéreo son ilimitadas, y con el tiempo hemos sido capaces de realizar planos más complejos.
Si necesitas más información contacta con nosotros en info@cromatica45.com

EN
We introduce to you our new creation: a show reel of the Madrid City with only aerial footage from different places of the city. By using our DJI Phantom equipment we were able to flight in places were other bigger drones would have more problems.
The possibilities of aerial videography are endless, and gradualy we’ve learn to do more complex movements with our copter to create better recordings.
If you need more information contact us at info@cromatica45.com

"El Paso" scene in Breaking Bad plus the rest of it from Bonnie Rose on Vimeo.

When Stephen Colbert talked to Vince Gilligan about the song El Paso used in the season finale of Breaking Bad, he asked if Felina was Jesse or the blue meth, and Vince basically said Felina was the blue meth.. Viewed that way, the song El Paso matches up with not only the scene it was used in and the season finale, but the entire series. Or at least I was able to shoehorn it all in, I have no idea if this is how the creators meant any of this. So I put together the rest of it, just the way I saw it, to the whole song before and after the actual scene from the finale.

2014 - on fire from David Samuel Ares Esteve on Vimeo.

Feliz Navidad y Feliz Año Nuevo¡
Merry Christmas & Happy New Year¡
Joyeux Noël et Bonne Année!
2014

music / let the groove get in - justin timberlake
video / burning car - superflex / ein traum fon afrika - leni riefenstahl
stars / 2013-2014

MUSEO from Fundación Jumex on Vimeo.

En noviembre de 2013 se estrena el Museo Jumex, la nueva plataforma principal de Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo. Conoce el edificio y la visión de la fundación para esta sede.

The Museo Jumex opens in November 2013, taking its place as the new main platform of Fundación Jumex Arte Contemporáneo. Get a preview of the building and the foundation’s plans for this site.

Producción: Buró-Buró
Realización: Inbox Films
Música original: Dario González Valderrama

Pencil / Think With Your Hands from FiftyThree on Vimeo.

Great tools inspire great ideas. Pencil is the most natural and expressive tool for getting ideas on Paper. Advanced technology meets beautiful design to keep you in the flow, without needing to switch tools. With Erase, Blend, and adaptive Palm Rejection, Pencil puts creative possibility in your hands.

Learn more about Pencil: fiftythree.com/pencil
Download Paper: itunes.apple.com/us/app/paper-by-fiftythree/id506003812?mt=8

Director: Andrew S Allen
Editing & Post Production: Kristofer Martin

Original Score: Patrick Cannell (patrickcannell.com)
Recording & Mastering: Jeremy Sklarsky (jeremysklarsky.com)
Cellist: Dave Eggar (facebook.com/daveeggar)
Recorded at Threshold Studios (thresholdstudios.com)

Music Supervision: Good Ear Music Supervision (goodear.tv)

Production: Allen Lau, Amy Cao, Denis Kovacs, KJ Chun, Jason Sondhi, Tara Feener

Special Thanks:
Chana Lee Mitty, Jen Mussari, and Amit Pitaru

folds | installation documentation | lindenau museum altenburg, germany | robert seidel | 2011 from Robert Seidel on Vimeo.

robertseidel.com/folds.225.0.html
FOLDS
Robert Seidel

Lindenau Museum / Altenburg, Germany
18.6.–14.8.2011
lindenau-museum.de

// Installation
2-channel video, HD, variable loop on 19th century plaster casts of Kladeos, Kephissos, Belvedere Torso, Seer and the Three Goddesses from the Bernhard August von Lindenau Collection
// Dimension: 7,2 × 1,9 × 2,4 m

// Part of Focus Young Art. 2011
A regional exhibition programme of the Juergen Ponto Foundation for promotion of Young Artists, Frankfurt am Main / juergen-ponto-stiftung.de

Documentation Editor Falk Müller
Documentation Sound Heiko Tippelt
Photography Jürgen M. Pietsch, Christian Seeling

// Artist Statement
The work folds for the Lindenau Museum (Altenburg, Germany) may be understood as a rapprochement with the history of the museum’s collection of plaster casts. I was particularly interested in the ancient, fragmented bodies – how through the loss of limbs they became almost abstract, fragmentary sculptures and yet still disclosed a nearly uncanny vitality. Also noteworthy is that the collection entails sculptures, Greek in origin, that have been replicated time and time again. Hewn from marble and partially painted in color, the originals were repeatedly copied in marble or plaster in different places across centuries, despoiled of color and slurred in detail.

Despite these multiple re-shapings that attend the loss of the original’s memory, new meanings and frictions arise with each copy in each respective present. They are the precondition for over 2400 years of the ongoing revitalization of the legacy of antiquity. The fold, a continually recurring visual and conceptual motif in my works, is for me the pictorial metaphor for these layers and distortions of meaning. In the projection the fold becomes connected to the fragmentary sculptures, swirls around them, makes them flow with bygone colors, protects or clothes them, gives them peace and lets them come alive for a moment, in order then to be stored as a further layer in the sediment of oblivion.

// Monographic Catalog available
FOLDS, Robert Seidel, Lindenau Museum Altenburg, ISBN 978-3-86104-070-0

robertseidel.com

Michael Rakowitz: Return from Smart Museum of Art on Vimeo.

Michael Rakowitz talks about Return, a project where he re-opened his grandfather’s import-export business in order to import Iraqi dates.

Learn more about Feast at smartmuseum.uchicago.edu/exhibitions/feast.

D (Detroit), short clip from video loop, 2007 from felix malnig on Vimeo.

D (Detroit)

c by Felix Malnig 2007
video loop, 16 minutes, silent

In Felix Malnig’s 2007 video D, a protean view of downtown Detroit is seen from the elevated tracks of the People Mover, a transportation system that circles the inner city. The train allows the rider—and the viewer—to see a passing city in a slow state of renewal but still blighted by neglect, failed projects and its own economically and socially challenged history. Along the way, the Renaissance Center appears; an important symbol of urban regeneration initiated in the early 70’s after rioting left the city burned and battered. The RenCen was completed in 1977 but never lived up to its potential as a spark for the development of new downtown. For Malnig, the Renaissance Center is an important symbol of the reality of many urban projects that attempt to positively change the fabric of urban living, but in the end, become empty commercial islands that do little to connect to the community or serve its constituents. Like his paintings and works on paper, Malnig’s film loop functions as a slow-moving frame that delivers scenes of a city in a state of change and evolution that ultimately returns to its own starting point. Felix Malnig lives and works in Vienna. He has shown his work throughout Europe; some of his signifcant recent exhibitions include Ghost Town at the Strabag Kunstforum, Vienna, Ghost Town at devening projects + editions, Chicago, Delusion at Habres + Partner, Vienna; First View at Hilger Contemporary, Vienna; artlab, Vienna; Visual Drugs, Zurich; and many more.

More information: felixmalnig.at

Dan Devening, 2008

Postmodernism at the V&A from Victoria and Albert Museum on Vimeo.

Postmodernism is the notoriously slippery subject tacked by the V&A’s exhibition, ‘Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990’. This fast-paced film features some of the most important living Postmodern practitioners, Charles Jencks, Robert A M Stern and Sir Terry Farrell among them, and asks them how and why Postmodernism came about, and what it means to be Postmodern.

TRANSCRIPT:

Andrew Logan: Post modernism – yes, I still really don’t understand what post modernism is. I’ve been told many times and it’s been explained to me many times and I still am bewildered. But perhaps that’s part of the movement – bewilderment.

Malcolm Garrett: I don’t think I really know too much about what post modernism actually is. For me, it’s primarily an architectural movement.

Robert A M Stern: Post modernism was a kind of style and it was kind of outrageous style at that.

Zandra Rhodes: I think we’re originals, but it wasn’t until I got spoken to by the V&A that I thought about anything that was post modern.

The way I worked I described as retrievalism.

Charles Jencks: The Independent said do use the word ‘post modernism’ because it means absolutely nothing and everything.

Malcolm Garrett: I called myself a new futurist for a while. So that’s a term I would use rather than post modernism.

Andrew Logan: Well, I suppose I had a very post modernist occurrence – I took acid. Normal things suddenly turned into something extraordinary.

Zandra Rhodes: Well, in 1977 punk was just starting to happen and I thought why not do tears that actually look like tears and then got safety pins and beaded round them like 12 years before Versace.

Malcolm Garrett: I had access to the first photocopier and I was able to modify and change the look of the image using a photocopier.

Peter Saville: And, of course, in the 70s and into the 80s the record cover was this incredibly important, vital medium of visual information. There were the music papers and occasionally the Sunday Times colour supplement might just do something about Andy Warhol in New York and that would be about it.

Paula Scher: In the 70s when I first started designing there was a predominance of the international style where the ultimate goal was to be clean and I always felt that that was like trying to clean up your room. So I was looking for ways of designing typography that could be more expressive, that were not about creating order but were about creating spirit.

Robert A M Stern: Times Square was where we were in charge - the whole revitalisation of Times Square is a very interesting, complicated story, but it does show the difference between the modernist point of view of how to redevelop or to develop a city and what we were able to do …

Charles Jencks: Post modern architecture is really to do with pluralism. You’ll find its depth, all of the great post modernism, the philosophy and now in literature, is about pluralism, pluralism, pluralism.

Robert A M Stern: To say, no, no, it’s a mess, in fact we ought to make it more of a mess. The world comes to Times Square not for tidykins, but for mess.

Charles Jencks: It’s accepting that the modern world with Freud, Marx, Henry Ford, mass production, is positive, but it can be radically improved.

Robert A M Stern: We studied the signage in Times Square and then we set minimums, minimums for sizes of signs, minimums for brightness of signs. What we were legislating in a way the capitalist impulse. Once you tell an entrepreneur that his or her sign can only be this big, he will be satisfied, he will agree with it. But if you say it can be this big or bigger or brighter, well everybody wants to compete in a capitalist society.

Charles Jencks: So you have to be on the one hand ironic about failures, probably the beginning of a new depression, another crisis of modernism, modernisation, modernity. What’s going to get us out of this? We have to re-think the modern movements in all the arts and in society and post modernism is the umbrella term for re-thinking.

Robert A M Stern: We knew 42nd Street was an incredible success when the Consolidated Edison Company called the State of New York and said, you know our grid is zapped out.

Peter Saville: In the case of, particularly, Joy Division and then New Order, they could never exactly agree amongst themselves. There was no hierarchical structure, particularly in New Order after the end of Joy Division, after Ian Curtis had died. The responsibility for the covers came to me and so they were about what I was interested in, they were about in a way beginning to learn the canon.

Carol McNicoll: The thing that I was doing was I was using slip casting. A lot of the Leach tradition and minimalist things also had that idea of expressing the deep, inner, mystic qualities of clay. And I thought that was a load of complete rubbish. And I thought what was wonderful about clay was the fact that you could make it look like anything else.

Peter Saville: They decided to call their first album “Movement”. The sequences and the pulse beat - there was a subtle transition from Joy Division to New Order and they had to find who they could be without Ian’s writing and without Ian’s singing. The pulse beat begins to become what New Order are about. I was quite happy to show New Order futurism because I was certain that Marinetti would have loved New Order.

Deyan Sudjic: Charles Jencks wrote this extraordinarily resonant sentence in ‘Post Modernism’ in which he said that modernism died in 1972 when Pruitt-Igoe was blown up.

Charles Jencks: In fact it goes back to the 60s really, in a radical way. Feminism, black power, a whole series of issues all over the world.

Terry Farrell: I think it was a release from constraint from the design codes – design as a function of the modern era.

Peter Saville: The notion of a singular aesthetic is untenable, is entirely unrealistic in a democratised society.

Terry Farrell: As such it was a Pandora’s box, the genie was out, so it’s about colour and ornament and try anything.

Robert A M Stern: If you take the actual broader, philosophical meaning of post modernism, there are no absolutes in art whether it’s architecture, painting, music, literature or whatever.

Terry Farrell: It’s a shift that brought the internet, the web – things were never the same again.

Reinhold Martin: During the - one of the high moments of modernism, the constructive period, artists like Varvara Steppanova and her colleagues, Rodchenko – the productivists. They were designing the way that they imagined the proletariat – the newly empowered and politicised proletariat - would dress. And the interesting question might be: What’s the difference between an Issey Miyake or a Commes des Garçons iteration of modernism? Can you imagine that garment in relation to political revolution? Probably not. You can imagine it as a kind of citation and if there is a thing called post modernism, it’s the absence of that thought. Can you imagine the Comme des Garçons worker? If the answer is no, then you’re in the world of post modernity.

Peter Saville: When Ian died, a kind of - the legend was sort of forged, almost overnight. The message of this story was more profound than any broadcast or marketing could ever be.

Carol McNicoll: One of the things that’s particular about the English tradition is that it’s very impure. Yes, we had an empire, we were forever nicking ideas from other places and kind of collage-ing them together.

Iain Sinclair: You’d have a piece of London that’s pre-Fire of London, that happens to have survived, right next to something that came in as a Christopher Wren development, something that came through the railway age, a cottage that’s hung on until it’s wiped out to put up a Westfield shopping mall, and all of these things co-exist.

Sam Jacob: That combination of complete victory of the neo-liberal economy alongside the diversity of culture, diversity of interests, I think makes it a place where things happen in a post modern way.

Iain Sinclair: And it all meshes on somewhere like the Thames, the reason for London’s foundation, that we come ashore from elsewhere and we reinvent ourselves by bringing people in that keep the culture alive.

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